Trump Supporters Boo CNN Live On-Air in Line for Tulsa MAGA Rally

Trump Supporters Boo CNN Live On-Air in Line for Tulsa MAGA Rally


CNN is known for not being friendly towards President Trump.

And his supporters aren't having it!

A video clip that is going viral shows Trump supporters booing a CNN reporter covering the Tulsa MAGA rally.

Trending: Car Plowed Through Crowd of Trump Supporters in CA, Tried To Flee; Multiple Injuries

The boos were extremely loud and one supporter even had an anti-fake news sign he was holding up in the background!

The media typically doesn't cover the crowd size at Trump's rallies.

Why?

Because it shows how enthusiastic and excited Trump supporters are, while Joe Biden can hardly fill a high school gymnasium.

But the media has suddenly been interested in covering the Tulsa rally.

This time… they're accusing Trump of facilitating the spread of COVID-19 by hosting a rally.

Nevermind-the-fact that these same reporters appeared to largely support the Black Lives Matter protests and riots.

See the footage below:

Political observers have noted that CNN has appeared to spend more time than usual covering a Trump MAGA rally.

But their coverage hasn't been exclusively on the crowd size or the enthusiasm.

Rather, CNN's coverage seems to focus more on the threat of COVID-19.

Coincidentally, there seemed to be hardly any talk of COVID-19 when thousands of people ACROSS THE NATION participated in protests... and others in riots.

See CNN's coverage of the Tulsa rally below:

To keep everyone safe, the campaign is taking temperature checks of everyone before the enter the arena.

Hand sanitizer will be provided and they will hand out face masks to anyone that didn't bring one.

However, this didn't stop CNN from reporting that Trump "tempts fate with Tulsa rally":

President Donald Trump returns to the campaign trail Saturday in Tulsa with his first rally since the coronavirus pandemic began, looking to reignite support for his struggling reelection bid while sweeping aside concerns from his own health experts and continuing to stoke tensions by threatening protesters outside his Oklahoma spectacle.

Trump is eager to resume the boisterous rallies that he believes were key to his 2016 victory at a time when his reelection prospects have dimmed, in large part because many Americans disapprove of his handling of both the coronavirus and his response to calls for racial justice that are gripping this country.

His own plans for the rally -- originally scheduled for Friday, which was Juneteenth -- the day marking the end of slavery in the United States -- may have only deepened the sense that the President, who has a history of making racist remarks and is opposed to renaming military bases named for Confederate leaders, is out of touch with a county trying to reckon with its racially violent past. That past is especially painful in Tulsa, home to a 1921 massacre of hundreds of Black Americans who were attacked by a White mob in Greenwood, a neighborhood then known as "Black Wall Street" that was looted and burned.

Trump is seeking to shift public attention from his especially difficult week, which included a series of unflattering bombshells revealed in a new book by his former national security adviser John Bolton, who described Trump as unfit for the White House, and two setbacks for his administration on LGBTQ rights and immigration at the Supreme Court. Late on Friday night, Trump's attorney general tried to oust a powerful US attorney who has investigated a number of associates of the President, but the Manhattan prosecutor refused to step down.

The President hopes to demonstrate vigor and resolve as America faces a pandemic, an economic crash and impassioned demonstrations against racism, while casting his rival Joe Biden as an aging political relic whose supporters lack enthusiasm for his bid. Trump's campaign spokesman told CNN this week that the rally will signal to the rest of the country "that it's time to get things moving again."

But by gathering his backers at Tulsa's Bank of Oklahoma Center arena -- an indoor venue that holds 19,000 people -- the President is zealously flouting nearly every one of the principles outlined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for gatherings of people, as CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta noted Friday.

Trump has long demonstrated his disdain for science, reason and the advice of experts, especially if it conflicts with his political goals. Even as he commands the highest office in the land, he has skillfully honed his image as an outsider operating from the inside in the eyes of his loyal base.

Relishing his instinct to divide at a time when he is trailing the former vice president by double digits in national polls, Trump sparked fears of confrontations in the streets of Tulsa when he warned in a Friday tweet that protesters would not be tolerated by law enforcement.

"Any protesters, anarchists, agitators, looters or lowlifes who are going to Oklahoma please understand, you will not be treated like you have been in New York, Seattle, or Minneapolis. It will be a much different scene!" he tweeted.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany insisted later Friday that the President was referring to "violent protesters, anarchists, looters," even though it was the administration that came under scrutiny for using force to push back peaceful protesters in Lafayette Square.

The President's ardent supporters have now been lining up for days in Tulsa hoping to be among the earliest entrants to his rally, while public health officials worry the rally could lead to a rapid spread of Covid-19 in a state already seeing a rise in cases.

Trump, who has asserted that the virus is "fading away" -- in direct contradiction to the facts -- has acknowledged that he and his advisers initially chose the Tulsa rally site in part because Oklahoma, a deep red state that has long voted Republican, appeared to have a lower incidence of coronavirus cases.

But that has changed in recent weeks. A CNN analysis of coronavirus data from John Hopkins University shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases is climbing each day -- and Tulsa is an area of particular concern.

During a news conference Wednesday, the director of the Tulsa Health Department, Dr. Bruce Dart, said Tulsa set a new daily record for coronavirus cases this week.

"Let me be clear. Anyone planning to attend a large-scale gathering will face an increased risk of becoming infected with Covid-19," Dart said.

These MAGA rallies are important because they allow President Trump to speak directly to the people without the media filter.

Voters were lined up as early as Tuesday for Saturday's rally.

The enthusiasm behind President Trump has never been greater!

The silent majority is eager to show their support for Trump yet again!

Don't believe the poll numbers.

Why?

They don't tell the whole story.

Trump has been largely out of the spotlight during the backlash after George Floyd's death.

The far left has attempted to tie Floyd's death to Trump.

Of course, President Trump has nothing to do with the tragedy and has even spoken out against it.

Now, President Trump will finally speak to the nation during his Tulsa rally.

He will once again define the narrative and shake things up!

NATIONAL POLL: Should Nancy Pelosi Be Removed From Office?

ABC Tulsa reports that this MAGA rally could single-handedly reset the entire campaign narrative:

Pressing ahead in a pandemic, President Donald Trump looked to reverse a decline in his political fortunes Saturday by returning to the format that has so often energized him and his loyal supporters: a raucous, no-holds-barred rally before tens of thousands of ardent fans, this time in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The rally was shaping up to be one of the biggest indoor events in the U.S. since large gatherings were shut down in March because of the coronavirus, and it was scheduled over the protests of local health officials and as COVID-19 cases spike in many states. The event was expected to draw crowds of protesters to the area as well.

It’s been more than three months since the nation last saw a Trump rally. The unemployment rate stood at about 3.5% that March 2. The number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. was estimated at 91. “Our country is stronger than ever before,” Trump declared.

Now, the unemployment rate stands at 13.3%, based on the most recent monthly report. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has soared to about 2.2 million. The number of deaths reported in the U.S. has surpassed 119,000. Outrage over the criminal justice system’s treatment of minorities following the death of George Floyd and other African Americans has spawned protests around the nation. Only about a quarter of Americans say the country is headed in the right direction.

Trump understands the stakes and was determined to return to his signature campaign events. He dismissed complaints that bringing together throngs for an indoor rally risked spreading the coronavirus as nothing more than politics.

“Big crowds and lines already forming in Tulsa. My campaign hasn’t started yet. It starts on Saturday night in Oklahoma!” Trump tweeted Friday.

Trump’s visit has also raised fears of clashes between protesters and Trump supporters. Officials expect a crowd of 100,000 people or more in downtown Tulsa. Trump will speak inside the BOK Center as well as at an outdoor stage. But his audience also will be voters in battleground states such as Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Florida.

Republican strategist Alex Conant said the rally gives the president a chance to reset his campaign after a couple of tough months.

“The Tulsa rally is trying to ignite some momentum in a campaign that’s been going nowhere,” Conant said. “When you look at the polls and then you look at the calendar, you realize he has to do something to try to reframe the election.”

Trump's MAGA rallies are so important because they allow him to speak straight to the American people without the media's biased filter.

People are excited to hear what President Trump has to say, and they're excited to show their support for another 4 more years!


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