Bloomberg: Taxing The Poor Is A “Good Thing” Because They’ll Have Less Money To Hurt Themselves


A resurfaced interview from 2018 is coming back to bite Michael Bloomberg in the ass, just as he’s officially entered the presidential race.

A clip from Bloomberg’s interview with the International Monetary Fund one year ago has shown him to be everything leftists claim they hate and wanna fight against – a rich, white, controlling elitist (but, let’s see if they can even pick up on this.)

During the interview, Bloomberg made a case for “regressive taxes” on the poor, arguing that they’re a “good thing… because the problem is in people that don’t have a lot of money. And so, higher taxes should have a bigger impact on their behavior and how they deal with themselves.”

Essentially, he’s saying that poor people lack control over their own selves and need to be taxed so that things that aren’t so healthy for them (like candy and soda) are farther out of reach.

In Bloomberg’s own words,

“If you raise taxes on full sugary drinks, for example, they will drink less, and there’s just no question that full sugar drinks are one of the major contributors to obesity, and obesity is one of the major contributors to heart disease and cancer and a variety of other things.”

Listen to what Bloomberg had to say about why taxing the poor is good here for yourself:

Bloomberg is the former NYC mayor who proposed to ban jumbo size soft drinks (which was struck down) but this interview makes him look even worse.

Since making its rounds online, the interview has earned Mike the nickname "Nanny State Mayor Bloomberg"!


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Newsmax has more to say about the resurfaced clip:

Twitter posters bashed billionaire and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg on Wednesday for comments made last year about taxing the poor to discourage them from smoking, consuming sugary drinks, or other activities that could endanger their lives.

"People say, 'taxes are regressive,'" Bloomberg said during an April 2018 interview at the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Washington. His comments were posted Wednesday on Twitter.

    

At the time, Bloomberg was the World Health Organization's ambassador for noncommunicable diseases — and he explained how his Bloomberg Philanthropies charity contributed to efforts to prevent such ailments.

Bloomberg, as New York City's mayor, was infamously known for proposing a ban on jumbo sugary drinks, which was later struck down by a New York State appellate court, and he later pumped $18 million into two successful California ballot initiatives on taxing heavily sweetened beverages.

PJ Media added some more insight:

Now that former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has announced his candidacy for president, he is -- of course -- fair game. And yes, that's great for us with a working memory. After all, there have been many times when Bloomberg proved himself to be an extremely arrogant member of the Know-It-All elite. Case in point? Just watch this video in which Bloomberg basically explains that it's a great idea to tax the poor because higher taxes mean they have less money to hurt themselves. Or something.

"[Some] say, well, 'taxes are regressive.' But in this case, yes they are, that's the good thing about them," Bloomberg said at the IMF's 2018 Spring Meeting about taxes on sugary drinks and such. "Because the problem is in people that don't have a lot of money. And so higher taxes should have a bigger impact on their behavior and how they deal with themselves."

In other words, Bloomberg wants to use taxes to make people behave in a way he thinks is best for them. It's Daddy Michael!

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