Skip to main content
WeLoveTrump.com may receive compensation from affiliate partners for some links on the site. Read our full Disclosure here.

China’s Out of Control Rocket Finally Landed, Here’s Where


4,794 views

In the last several weeks, scientists have been worried about China’s uncontrolled rocket debris that was being hurled toward the earth.

Well, now scientists don’t have to worry after China’s Long March 5B rocket debris has officially landed in the Indian Ocean.

The landing of the debris was announced by the United States Space Command Unit.

China’s reckless launch has the aerospace community irritated and jas raised the question is China really that incompetent when it comes to launching rockets or did they purposely allow the debris to descend towards the earth?

The Washington Examiner had more details to add:

Debris from China’s Long March 5B rocket has fallen into the Indian Ocean, U.S. Space Command confirmed in a tweet Saturday.

The debris fell at approximately 10:45 a.m. MDT, officials said, refusing to provide further details and referring all other questions to the People’s Republic of China.

“[We] can confirm the People’s Republic of China (PRC) Long March 5B (CZ-5B) re-entered over the Indian Ocean at approx 10:45 am MDT on 7/30,” the tweet read. “We refer you to the #PRC for further details on the reentry’s technical aspects such as potential debris dispersal+ impact location.”

China has yet to make a statement on the matter. Its procedure has drawn criticism from those in the aerospace industry.

“The People’s Republic of China did not share specific trajectory information as their Long March 5B rocket fell back to Earth,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson tweeted Saturday. “All spacefaring nations should follow established best practices, and do their part to share this type of information in advance to allow reliable predictions of potential debris impact risk, especially for heavy-lift vehicles, like the Long March 5B, which carry a significant risk of loss of life and property.”

“Doing so is critical to the responsible use of space and to ensure the safety of people here on Earth,” he said.

While astronomer Jonathan McDowell noted the rocket stage was not “actively deorbited,” other astronomers anticipated the effects would remain minimal.

Citizens of Malaysia were able to have a good look at the rocket debris:

CNBC had these details to chip in:

A Chinese rocket fell back to Earth on Saturday over the Indian Ocean but NASA said Beijing had not shared the “specific trajectory information” needed to know where possible debris might fall.

U.S. Space Command said the Long March 5B rocket re-entered over the Indian Ocean at approximately 12:45 p.m. EDT Saturday (1645 GMT), but referred questions about “reentry’s technical aspects such as potential debris dispersal impact location” to China.

“All spacefaring nations should follow established best practices and do their part to share this type of information in advance to allow reliable predictions of potential debris impact risk,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said. “Doing so is critical to the responsible use of space and to ensure the safety of people here on Earth.”

Social media users in Malaysia posted video of what appeared to be rocket debris.

Aerospace Corp, a government funded nonprofit research center near Los Angeles, said it was reckless to allow the rocket’s entire main-core stage — which weighs 22.5 tons (about 48,500 lb) — to return to Earth in an uncontrolled reentry.



 

Join the conversation!

Please share your thoughts about this article below. We value your opinions, and would love to see you add to the discussion!

Thanks for sharing!