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Michigan Judge Says Fraudulent Absentee Ballets Were Accepted in 2020 Election


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What have we always said?

The truth comes out eventually.

This appears to be the case when it comes to the 2020 presidential election.

There has been a steady drip-drip-drip of new revelations and EVIDENCE that there was foul play.

Now, a Michigan judge is on the record saying that FRAUDULENT absentee ballots were accepted in Michigan!

Do you remember when the Democrats and the media told us there was NO voter fraud?

Then suddenly… their narrative changed to there wasn’t enough voter fraud to change the outcome of the election…

Well…

Don’t be surprised if their narrative and excuse-making changes yet again as more proof like this continues to come out.

More details on the judge’s statements and court’s ruling below:

Democrats claimed that Trump’s lawsuits were baseless.

They claimed that there was nothing fishy going on with mail-in absentee ballots.

But apparently this Michigan judge disagrees!

Why isn’t this the top headline everywhere?!

Because the media doesn’t want the American people to know the truth.

Local Detroit News reports:

State Court of Claims Judge Christopher Murray has ruled invalid Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s guidance issued to Michigan clerks in early October that instructed them to presume the accuracy of absentee ballot signatures.

Because Benson did not go through the proper rule-making process when issuing the guidance, clerks do not need to comply with it for future elections, Murray ruled last week.

“The presumption is found nowhere in state law,” wrote Murray, an appointee of Republican former Gov. John Engler. “The mandatory presumption goes beyond the realm of mere advice and direction, and instead is a substantive directive that adds to the pertinent signature-matching standards.”

The office of Benson, a Detroit Democrat, declined comment on the decision.

The Michigan Republican Party, one of the plaintiffs in the suit, celebrated the decision but noted it came too late to make a difference in the November election.

“It was clear from the outset that the secretary of state had violated Election Law by unilaterally directing local clerks to ignore their statutory obligation to compare absentee ballot signatures,” said Ted Goodman, communications director for the state GOP.

Michigan law requires clerks to match required signatures on absentee ballot applications and absentee ballot envelopes with the voter signature on file to ensure the person submitting the ballot is the same one registered to vote in Michigan.

But state law doesn’t define what it means for signatures to “agree sufficiently.”

Benson on Oct. 6 instructed clerks who were matching signatures that they “must perform” their duties under the “presumption” that the signature is valid and uphold the signature’s validity if there were “more matching features than nonmatching features.” Whenever possible, clerks and election officials were instructed to resolve slight differences “in favor of finding that the voter’s signature was valid,” Murray wrote.

Allegan County Clerk Robert Genetski and the Michigan Republican Party filed a complaint the same day and amended it Dec. 30 to argue the directive was unlawful. But Genetski did not allege that Benson’s directive “caused him to accept a signature that he believed was invalid,” according to Murray’s decision.

The judge didn’t rule on whether Benson’s directive violated state election law, but did say the directive violated the Administrative Procedures Act, the process that must be followed when an agency creates new rules.

“….Nowhere in the state’s election law has the Legislature indicated that signatures are to be presumed valid, nor did the Legislature require that signatures are to be accepted so long as there are any redeeming qualities in the application or return envelope signature as compared with the signature on file,” Murray wrote.

“Policy determinations like the one at issue — which places a thumb on the scale in favor of a signature’s validity — should be made pursuant to properly promulgated rules under the APA or by the Legislature,” he wrote.

The Administrative Procedures Act requires state agencies that are developing a rule to better implement state law to go through months of public notices, drafts, impact analyses, public comment and public hearings.

When a final version of the rule is complete, it is submitted to the Legislature’s bipartisan Joint Committee on Administrative Rules. The committee has 15 session days to take action on the rules before they are finalized and filed with the secretary of state.

Murray rejected a request for additional audits to look at the effect the directive had on the November election.

The Michigan Constitution only speaks to “election results,” not to the process by which signatures are matched, and the Constitution leaves the manner by which an audit is conducted to the secretary of state.

“There is no support in the statute for plaintiffs to demand that an audit cover the subject of their choosing or to dictate the manner in which an audit is conducted,” Murray wrote.

Remember, folks… the 2020 election was death by a thousand cuts.

There wasn’t 1 fatal blow that handed Joe Biden the presidency.

It was thousands of irregularities that added up together to result in a fraudulent election.

Fortunately… piece by piece… this whole scam is falling apart.

Once again… President Trump was right.

Will the media apologize?

No…

But those of us who pay attention know the truth.

Breitbart confirms this bombshell development:

A Michigan judge ruled last week Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (D) broke state law when she unilaterally issued rules related to absentee balloting, legitimizing a key claim made by the Trump campaign in its legal challenges to the 2020 election.

Benson issued several unilateral orders during the 2020 election including sending absentee ballot applications to all registered voters. She also issued “guidance” on how to evaluate absentee ballots, a move Michigan Court of Claims Chief Judge Christopher Murray held violated the state’s Administrative Procedures Act.

“I’m glad the court sees Secretary of State Benson’s attempts at lawmaking for what they are — clear violations of her authority,” Michigan state Rep. Matt Hall (R) said in a statement.

“If she wants to make changes like these, she needs to work with the Legislature or properly promulgate them through the laws we have on the books — in this case the Administrative Procedures Act,” he continued.

Murray’s ruling came after Allegan County Clerk Bob Genetski sued Benson and state Director of Elections Jonathan Brater over Benson’s order which Hall described as a “mandatory directive requiring local election officials to apply a presumption of validity to all signatures on absent voter ballots.”

According to the suit, Genetski argued “the presumption contained in the guidance issued by defendant Benson will allow invalid votes to be counted,” but Genetski did not allege “that this guidance caused him to accept a signature that he believed was invalid.”

The court’s opinion concluded:

…nowhere in this state’s election law has the Legislature indicated that signatures are to be presumed valid, nor did the Legislature require that signatures are to be accepted so long as there are any redeeming qualities in the application or return envelope as compared with the signature on file. Policy determinations like the one at issue — which places the thumb on the scale in favor of a signature’s validity — should be made pursuant to properly promulgated rules under the APA or by the Legislature.

Like other progressive secretaries of state, Benson put an aggressive emphasis on voting by absentee ballot in the name of safety amid the Chinese coronavirus pandemic.

Over 3.1 million Michigan voters cast an absentee ballot out of a possible 7.7 million voters, WWMT News reported.

In May 2020, Benson used $4.5 million in funds from the CARES Act — the original coronavirus stimulus — to send absentee ballot applications to all voters, according to Breitbart News.

Be sure to share this article with your friends!

We need more and more people being made aware of the shenanigans that took place in 2020.

Remember, there is strength in numbers.

And the truth will prevail!



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