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New California Public School Curriculum Has Students Chanting To The Aztec “god” of Human Sacrifice


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How charming….

You ok with your children in public education chanting ancient Aztec chants to the “god” of Human Sacrifice?

Hope so, because that’s what’s happening right now in California.

Yup, that’s where all this “diversity” and “tolerance” eventually goes….right back to ancient “gods” and giving them sacrifices and chants.

How “progressive”!

How diverse!

What a huge load of crap, more like it!

Sadly, I’m not making any of this up.

Take a look:

From Charlie Kirk:

The program, called the Ethnic Studies Model Curriculum, “seeks to extend the Left’s cultural dominance of California’s public university system, 50 years in the making, to the state’s entire primary and secondary education system, which consists of 10,000 public schools serving a total of 6 million students,” writes Rufo.

The curriculum instructs teachers to help students “challenge racist, bigoted, discriminatory, imperialist/colonial beliefs.” This will help the educators inspire students to take part in “social movements that struggle for social justice” and “build new possibilities for a post-racist, post-systemic racism society.”

The education program often cites the book, Rethinking Ethnic Studies by R. Tolteka Cuauhtin, the original cochair of the Ethnic Studies Model Curriculum.

According to Rufo, Cuauhtin argues in his book that the U.S. was founded on “Eurocentric, white supremacist (racist, anti-Black, anti-Indigenous), capitalist (classist), patriarchal (sexist and misogynistic), heteropatriarchal (homophobic), and anthropocentric paradigm brought from Europe.”

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As far as religion is concerned, the program has a disturbing “ethnic studies community chant.”

Rufo explains:

The curriculum recommends that teachers lead their students in a series of indigenous songs, chants, and affirmations, including the “In Lak Ech Affirmation,” which appeals directly to the Aztec gods. Students first clap and chant to the god Tezkatlipoka—whom the Aztecs traditionally worshipped with human sacrifice and cannibalism—asking him for the power to be “warriors” for “social justice.” Next, the students chant to the gods Quetzalcoatl, Huitzilopochtli, and Xipe Totek, seeking “healing epistemologies” and “a revolutionary spirit.” Huitzilopochtli, in particular, is the Aztec deity of war and inspired hundreds of thousands of human sacrifices during Aztec rule. Finally, the chant comes to a climax with a request for “liberation, transformation, [and] decolonization,” after which students shout “Panche beh! Panche beh!” in pursuit of ultimate “critical consciousness.”

And from the City Journal:

This religious concept is fleshed out in the model curriculum’s official “ethnic studies community chant.” The curriculum recommends that teachers lead their students in a series of indigenous songs, chants, and affirmations, including the “In Lak Ech Affirmation,” which appeals directly to the Aztec gods. Students first clap and chant to the god Tezkatlipoka—whom the Aztecs traditionally worshipped with human sacrifice and cannibalism—asking him for the power to be “warriors” for “social justice.” Next, the students chant to the gods Quetzalcoatl, Huitzilopochtli, and Xipe Totek, seeking “healing epistemologies” and “a revolutionary spirit.” Huitzilopochtli, in particular, is the Aztec deity of war and inspired hundreds of thousands of human sacrifices during Aztec rule. Finally, the chant comes to a climax with a request for “liberation, transformation, [and] decolonization,” after which students shout “Panche beh! Panche beh!” in pursuit of ultimate “critical consciousness.”

The chants have a clear implication: the displacement of the Christian god, which is said to be an extension of white supremacist oppression, and the restoration of the indigenous gods to their rightful place in the social justice cosmology. It is, in a philosophical sense, a revenge of the gods.

California parents should be concerned. Under the guise of “equity” and “empowerment,” activists within the public education system have developed this radical new curriculum in order to transform California schools into factories for left-wing political activism. They have recast the United States as an oppressor nation that must be deconstructed and subverted through politics. The curriculum’s vision statement makes this aim explicit: it presents education not as a means of achieving competency, but as a “tool for transformation, social, economic, and political change, and liberation.”

From Fox News:

The California Department of Education has proposed an ethnic studies “model curriculum” that includes, among other things, chanting the names of Aztec gods in an attempt to build unity among schoolchildren.

Included in the draft curriculum is a list of “lesson resources” with a chant based on “In Lak Ech,” which it describes as “love, unity, mutual respect,” and “Panche Be,” which it describes as “seeking the roots of truth.”

The chant starts with a declaration that “you are my other me” and “if I do harm to you, I do harm to myself.” Before chanting the name of the Aztec god Tezkatlipoka, the text reads: “Seeking the roots of the truth, seeking the truth of the roots, elders and us youth, (youth), critical thinking through.”

It adds: “Tezkatlipoka, Tezkatlipoka, x2 smoking mirror, self-reflection Tezkatlipoka.”

Tezkatlipoka is the name of an Aztec god that was honored with human sacrifice. According to the World History Encyclopedia, an impersonator of Tezkatlipoka would be sacrificed with his heart removed to honor the deity.

In Aztec mythology, Tezkatlipoka is the brother of Quetzalcoatl, Huizilopochtli and Xipe Totec — all of whom appear to be invoked in the proposed chant.

A portion read, “pulsating creation huitzilopochtli cause like sunlight, the light inside of us, in will to action’s what brings… Xipe Totek, Xipe Totek, x2 transformation, liberation, education, emancipation. imagination revitalization, liberation, transformation, decolonization, liberation, education, emancipation, changin’ our situation in this human transformation.”

A linked video showed what appeared to be students engaging in a unity chant with some of the language described.

Another chant used the term “Hunab Ku,” or “One-God,” which Encyclopedia Brittanica identified as a Mayan deity.

That portion of the chant read: “we’re here to transform the world we’re spiraling, rotating & revolving in, giving thanks daily, tlazokamati, giving thanks daily, tlazokamati, healing & transforming as we’re evolving in this universe, universe, of Hunab Ku, Hunab Ku, x2 Nahui OlIin Lak Ech – Panche Beh, Ethnic Studies For All, Represent!!”

According to CDE’s website, the school board is supposed to review a draft of the curriculum on March 17-18. CDE did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Reported by Discovery Institute researcher Chris Rufo, the curriculum was just one of many diversity programs to gain attention in recent months. Much of its language and content bears resemblance to other programs that have been associated with critical race theory — a controversial way of analyzing identity that has been the subject of intense debate.

The California curriculum’s introduction argued that the program would help marginalized groups.

“By affirming the identities and contributions of marginalized groups in our society, ethnic studies helps students see themselves and each other as part of the narrative of the United States,” it read. “Importantly, this helps students see themselves as active agents in the interethnic bridge-building process we call American life.”

The guiding principles included goals including, “celebrate and honor Native People/s of the land and communities of Black Indigenous People of Color.” Another guiding principle read: “Center and place high value on the pre-colonial, ancestral knowledge, narratives, and communal experiences of Native people/s and people of color and groups that are typically marginalized in society.”

The field of ethnic studies, it claimed, “critically grapples with the various power structures and forms of oppression that continue to have social, emotional, cultural, economic, and political impacts.”

The above chants were part of a list of instructional resources for educators to use in order to facilitate discussions about “race, racism, bigotry, and the experiences of diverse Americans.”

The “chants, affirmations, and energizers,” the curriculum read, “can be used as energizers to bring the class together, build unity around ethnic studies principles and values, and to reinvigorate the class following a lesson that may be emotionally taxing or even when student engagement may appear to be low.”

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