Obama Says VILE Things About Sarah Palin


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This guy is just plain evil and loathsome.

Here we are and he still can’t get over Sarah Palin?

These Democrats really hate the true patriots, don’t they?

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Look at these disgusting comments:

Also, who is reading this guy’s book?

I can’t imagine hating my time so much that I would actually fill my brain with this toxic drivel.

PUKE!

From CNN you can see how highly Barrack HUSSEIN Obama thinks of himself:

Barack Obama directly confronts the racist politics of President Donald Trump in the first volume of his post-presidency memoir, bluntly suggesting how he believes his historic election in 2008 opened a wave of bitter and divisive turmoil that fueled Republicans’ obstructionism and ultimately changed the party, according to a copy of the book obtained by CNN.

“It was as if my very presence in the White House had triggered a deep-seated panic, a sense that the natural order had been disrupted,” Obama writes. “Which is exactly what Donald Trump understood when he started peddling assertions that I had not been born in the United States and was thus an illegitimate president. For millions of Americans spooked by a Black man in the White House, he promised an elixir for their racial anxiety.”The 768-page memoir, titled A Promised Land and due out on November 17, chronicles the future president’s childhood and political rise, before diving deeply into his historic 2008 campaign and first four years in office. Obama dedicates hundreds of pages to the fights and characters that colored his tenure, from his work to pass Obamacare in 2010 to the complexities of dealing with a slate of world leaders and finally his decision to approve the raid that killed Osama bin Laden.

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and members of the national security team receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC.

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and members of the national security team receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC.

But some of his most thoughtful examination comes at the expense of the party that opposed him and how it evolved during his eight years in office, starting with the elevation of Sarah Palin to the Republican presidential ticket in 2008. “Through Palin, it seemed as if the dark spirits that had long been lurking on the edges of the modern Republican Party — xenophobia, anti intellectualism, paranoid conspiracy theories, an antipathy toward Black and brown folks — were finding their way to center stage,” Obama writes

Throughout, Obama casts his presidency as comprised of hard choices, sometimes made more difficult by internal disputes, mismanagement by the previous administration and obstructionism by Republicans, which he suggests was rooted in an attempt to appeal to anxieties about the first Black president.

Yet he also acknowledges his own shortcomings on a range of topics, like calling his failure to pass immigration reform “a bitter pill to swallow” and acknowledging that the economy “stank” as he headed into the 2010 midterms, where Republicans reclaimed the House of Representatives on the back of the Tea Party movement.

“As far as I was concerned, the election didn’t prove our agenda had been wrong,” Obama writes of 2010. “It just proved that… I’d failed to rally the nation, as FDR had once done, behind what I knew to be right. Which to me was just as CNN’s Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know.

The timeliest reflections, however, come when Obama delves into the politics of Washington, particularly the work he put into negotiations with Republicans like Republican leader Sen. Mitch McConnell and then House Speaker John Boehner. But that introspection also offers a window into how Obama saw the opposing party change from his 2008 campaign to when he handed over the White House to Trump in 2017.

Obama writes that he “wonder(s) sometimes” about whether 2008 Republican nominee John McCain would still have picked Palin if he had known “her spectacular rise and her validation as a candidate would provide a template for future politicians, shifting his party’s center and the country’s politics overall in a direction he abhorred.”

“I’d like to think that given the chance to do it over again, he might have chosen differently,” Obama writes. “I believe he really did put his country first.”

That wasn’t all:

From the Washington Examiner:

Former President Barack Obama suggests his historic 2008 election prompted a racial backlash in pockets of the country, sentiments latched onto by President Trump, in the first of his two-part, post-White House memoir.

“It was as if my very presence in the White House had triggered a deep-seated panic, a sense that the natural order had been disrupted,” Obama writes in excerpts of the first, 768-page A Promised Land, according to CNN.

In the book, due to be released on Nov. 17, Obama shares childhood memories and discusses his sharp ascent in politics, his 2008 presidential campaign, and his first term’s accomplishments and disappointments.

But on the issue of race, he details how Americans were “spooked by a black man in the White House,” calling out 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin in particular for giving a voice to those concerns.

“Through Palin, it seemed as if the dark spirits that had long been lurking on the edges of the modern Republican Party — xenophobia, anti intellectualism, paranoid conspiracy theories, an antipathy toward Black and brown folks — were finding their way to center stage,” he writes.

Obama also reflects on his relationship with his two-term vice president, presumptive President-elect Joe Biden. During their time in office, Biden earned a reputation within the administration for his contrarian opinions and advice but was relied on as the White House’s de facto congressional liaison with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

“One of the reasons I’d chosen Joe to act as an intermediary — in addition to his Senate experience and legislative acumen — was my awareness that in McConnell’s mind, negotiations with the vice president didn’t inflame the Republican base in quite the same way that any appearance of cooperation with (Black, Muslim socialist) Obama was bound to do,” he writes.

In a nod to Trump’s challenging last week’s election and blocking the transition process, Obama praised Bush’s “basic decency” as one of the reasons he facilitated a smooth transfer of power, despite Obama’s 2008 bid being a repudiation of the Bush years.

But Palin didn’t miss a beat.

Firing back:

From our friends at Newsmax:

Sarah Palin told Newsmax TV that the jabs that former President Barack Obama took at her in his new book are just proof that he still has a grudge against the former vice presidential candidate.

“Who the heck does he think he is? Moses? God? He sure tries to make this sound scary and spooky. And he’s so, still, so 2008. It’s funny because with the price of rent today, it’s kind of pleasurable to know that I’ve been living rent-free in his head for 12 years,” Palin told Friday’s “Greg Kelly Reports.”

“The movement that he still cannot accept nor understand that began in our campaign that he now, I guess blames me for … that movement was all about giving the voiceless a voice, empowering people who are fed up, want accountability in their government, want a smaller and smarter government, things that he just hasn’t been able to grasp, and all these years later, it’s just like … get over it,” Palin said.

“To consider now that there is more diversity within the right-wing of politics than there has ever been, that has been propelled during the ’08 campaign as well,” Palin said.



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