San Diego Officials Say New Wall Is Working, Driving Border Numbers Down


President Trump’s border wall is working, just ask the men guarding the border in San Diego!

In May 2018, a project to install a new, better border barrier along the California-Mexico border in San Diego started. This project is now complete, and a new project to build new miles onto the border wall began February. An additional 2 miles of border wall have been added so far, but its far from over, as Trump’s end goal for the region is to erect around 500 miles of border wall by the end of 2020.

Although not yet complete, the border wall is already doing WONDERS to curb the flow of illegal immigrants into the United States. Border patrol agents are speaking out to praise the border wall for the drastic change in border numbers.

Last November, before the wall was put up, a trove of immigrants simply trampled over the old landing mat barriers. Now, according to Chief of Border Patrol in San Diego Douglas Harrison,

“It’s incredibly different…I’m able to see the old landing mat right next to the bollard and I’m able to see the old mesh right next to the new bollard and the difference is startling.”

The wall can’t be easily scaled either. As Harrison said,

“It’s an intimidating barrier. I’m an old Army guy, I was in the 101st Airborne and I would not try to cross that.”

Check out news of the border wall’s performance in San Diego that is being shared on Twitter:

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Here's more on this from Fox News:

In November of last year, when a caravan of hundreds of migrants approached the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego, they faced old landing mat barriers erected decades ago. Border agents say the migrants simply trampled over it as they sought entry into the United States to claim asylum.

The situation on the ground is much different now.

As part of President Trump’s campaign promise to build a wall along the southern border, 14 miles of 18-foot primary steel bollard fencing has been built in San Diego, with a secondary 30-foot steel bollard barrier behind that which is approximately 80 percent complete.

They replace the 8-foot landing mats, which were often supported by a steel mesh behind that. The difference is dramatic.

“It's incredibly different...I’m able to see the old landing mat right next to the bollard and I'm able to see the old mesh right next to the new bollard and the difference is startling,” Douglas Harrison, Chief Patrol Agent of U.S. Border Patrol’s San Diego Sector, told Fox News.

Harrison explained that it’s not a barrier that can be easily scaled: “It’s an intimidating barrier. I'm an old Army guy, I was in the 101st Airborne and I would not try to cross that.”

The project to install 14 miles of replacement barriers began in May 2018 and is now complete. The secondary project began in February this year and it includes two miles of wall that did not exist before, officials say.

It’s part of a project that has, across the whole border, seen 71 miles completed, with an additional 162 currently under construction and an additional 276 miles in the “pre-construction” phase. It’s part of an ambitious plan to get somewhere close to 450-500 miles completed by the end of 2020.

Trump visited the San Diego project in September and spoke of it in glowing terms — even signing his name on the barrier.

“So it’s a very powerful, very powerful wall, the likes of which, probably, to this extent, has not been built before,” he said.

"But the numbers now are way down," he later added. "And as the wall goes up — literally, as the wall goes up, the numbers go down."

How effective the new barrier is being, in terms of both deterring migrants and stopping crossings, is tough to calculate. One thing that is clear is that its erection is coinciding with a sharp decline in apprehensions, although correlation does not necessarily equate to causation. In August, there were 3,326 apprehensions in the San Diego sector, down from 6,880 in March and 5,884 in May.

PJ Media added:

Do border walls work? Based on the evidence at the new border wall in San Diego, they do. A year ago, the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego was an easy spot for caravans to send migrants into the United States. Not so much anymore, according to a report from Fox News. A 14-mile long border wall in San Diego that replaced an old fence is already working wonders.

 “It's incredibly different...I’m able to see the old landing mat right next to the bollard and I'm able to see the old mesh right next to the new bollard and the difference is startling,” Douglas Harrison, Chief Patrol Agent of U.S. Border Patrol’s San Diego Sector, told Fox News.  

Harrison explained that it’s not a barrier that can be easily scaled: “It’s an intimidating barrier. I'm an old Army guy, I was in the 101st Airborne and I would not try to cross that.”

 

The project to install 14 miles of replacement barriers began in May 2018 and is now complete. The secondary project began in February this year and it includes two miles of wall that did not exist before, officials say.

 

It’s part of a project that has, across the whole border, seen 71 miles completed, with an additional 162 currently under construction and an additional 276 miles in the “pre-construction” phase. It’s part of an ambitious plan to get somewhere close to 450-500 miles completed by the end of 2020.

While calculating the effectiveness of the barrier in terms of deterrence and preventing crossings is difficult, the erecting of the new wall coincided with a sharp decline in apprehensions.

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