California Makes It Harder To Obtain Arrest Data From Kamala Harris Years


After Democrat presidential hopeful Tulsi Gabbard called out Kamala Harris for her track record during her time as Attorney-General of California, the Golden state (conveniently) removed online archives of arrest records during the years 2011-2017, when Harris was AG.

When asked during the second Democrat debates about criminal justice reform, Gabbard had alleged that Kamala Harris, “put over 1,500 people in jail for marijuana violations and laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana,” and that, 

“She blocked evidence that would have freed an innocent man from death row. She kept people in prison beyond their sentences to use them as cheap labor for the state of California, and she fought to keep cash bail system in place that impacts poor people in the worst kind of way.”

For reference, here’s the clip from Tulsi Gabbard’s twitter of the moment during the debate:

Before Gabbard made the accusations about Harris, all incarceration records were available on the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation website.

Now, all the records have been removed as part of changes the department is making to "comply with a California law."

Take a look at news of this that hit Twitter:

Tucker Carlson gave a great explanation of Kamala Harris' background and the removal of the arrest records. 

Watch the video of what he had to say about it here:

The Daily Caller has more to say:

California’s Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation website has removed public access to several key incarceration reports as a part of a site redesign.

 

The move, first reported by the Washington Free Beacon, comes as its former attorney general, Kamala Harris, is drawing scrutiny from fellow Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard and others for her arrest record while in the post.

 

From the report:

 


Twice a year, the CDCR releases information about the number of new individuals incarcerated in the California prison system as part of its “Offender Data Points” series. These reports provide important information on demographics, sentence length, offense type, and other figures relevant to criminal justice and incarceration.

 

Until recently, these reports were publicly available at the CDCR’s website. A search using archive.org’s Wayback Machine reveals that as of April 25, 2019—the most recent indexed date—ODP reports were available dating back to the spring of 2009. As of August 2019, the same web page now serves only a single ODP report, the one for Spring 2019. The pre-2019 reports have been removed.


Harris, who served as the state’s top cop from 2011 to 2017, was harshly criticized by Gabbard, who demanded she apologize to the “people who suffered under [her] reign as prosecutor” during Wednesday night’s Democratic debate.

 

“I want to bring the conversation back to the criminal justice system that is disproportionately, negatively affecting black and brown people today,” the Hawaiian congresswoman said Wednesday. “Senator Harris says she’s proud of her record as a prosecutor and that she’ll be a prosecutor president, but I’m deeply concerned about this record of Senator Harris’.”

The Washington Free Beacon also stated:

A redesign of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation website will make it harder for voters to inspect Sen. Kamala Harris's controversial record as the state's top cop.

The department removed public access to a number of reports on incarceration in the state, including when presidential candidate Kamala Harris (D.) was California's attorney general. Twice a year, the CDCR releases information about the number of new individuals incarcerated in the California prison system as part of its "Offender Data Points" series. These reports provide important information on demographics, sentence length, offense type, and other figures relevant to criminal justice and incarceration.

Until recently, these reports were publicly available at the CDCR's website. A search using archive.org's Wayback Machine reveals that as of April 25, 2019—the most recent indexed date—ODP reports were available dating back to the spring of 2009. As of August 2019, the same web page now serves only a single ODP report, the one for Spring 2019. The pre-2019 reports have been removed.

The changes matter in part because the reports contain information about Harris's entire time as state A.G., 2011 to 2017. Harris has taken fire from multiple opponents for her "tough on crime" record as California's top cop, an image that she has tried to shed as a far-left senator and presidential candidate.

One particularly brutal attack came Wednesday night when Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D., Hi.) laid into Harris for her record on criminal justice. Gabbard cited a Washington Free Beacon analysis — based in part on the ODP reports — that found that more than 1,500 Californians were sent to prison for marijuana-related offenses while Harris was attorney general.

OANN additionally commented:

California is making it difficult for primary voters to review the criminal justice record of presidential hopeful Kamala Harris. The state’s Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation recently removed archives on incarceration rates from its website.

The reports contained information from Harris’ tenure as attorney general from 2011 through 2017. During that time, data shows more than 120,000 black and Latino citizens were sent to prison.

Harris has attempted to portray herself as a progressive on criminal justice on the campaign trail, but her record has faced growing scrutiny. 

What do you think?

Was the "website redesign" motivated by a desire to keep the public from seeing the arrest records during Kamala Harris' time as CA AG?

We'd love to hear what you think - share your thoughts on this with us and spread the word on this news that the mainstream media won't cover on Twitter!

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