Dems Lose It Over Trump Not Backing Down On Citizenship Question for 2020 Census!


Trump wants the 2020 census to include a question about citizenship status, which, to no surprise, has sparked Democrat outrage!

Despite the Supreme Court ruling against the president’s wishes and media reports claiming that the Department of Commerce dropped the issue, Trump has instructed the DOJ to find a way to make sure that the citizenship question ends up on the census.

Take a look at this tweet that President Trump posted regarding the situation:

News of Trump's refusal to back down has blown up on Twitter.

Check it out:

And, of course, you won't be shocked to hear that Democrats are taking to Twitter to cry out that it is "unfair for immigrants" to ask people whether or not they are U.S. citizens on the census.

Democrat Governor of California Gavin Newson called it "scare tactics against our immigrant communities":

Joe Biden took the side of the immigrants on the issue:

Democrat Twitter user Tom Perez also complained about Trump's drive, implying that it wouldn't be "fair" or "accurate" if the citizenship question was included (what?):

Liberal Berkeley professor Robert Reich even said that Trump should be impeached over his push for the question to be included in the census:

NBC News has more on the situation that Dems are going crazy over:

A top Justice Department lawyer said Wednesday the agency is trying to find a "legally available path" to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census after President Donald Trump tweeted that "We are absolutely moving forward" — despite a Supreme Court ruling and public statements from the Justice and Commerce departmentsto the contrary.

The lawyer's statement represented a complete reversal of the government's position from Tuesday, when officials said they would honor the high court's ruling and begin printing census forms without the citizenship question. The lawyer said the reversal was solely because of Trump's tweet, which Justice Department officials are still trying to interpret.

Outside groups that had sued the government said the question was designed to reduce the numbers of immigrants and minorities who are counted in the census, which could have the effect of benefiting Republicans politically. The Supreme Court said the government had failed to justify the need for the question, and the matter seemed settled until Trump weighed in Wednesday morning.

"The News Reports about the Department of Commerce dropping its quest to put the Citizenship Question on the Census is incorrect or, to state it differently, FAKE!” Trump tweeted.

“We are absolutely moving forward, as we must, because of the importance of the answer to this question,” Trump added.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether Trump’s tweet meant he intended to defy the plans to print the survey without the question, or was arguing to continue the legal case in support of including the question in the future.

On an emergency conference call in the underlying federal court case in Maryland on Wednesday, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division Joseph Hunt told the judge the situation is "fluid."

"We at the Department of Justice have been instructed to examine whether there is a path forward, consistent with the Supreme Court's decision, that would allow to include the citizenship question on the census. We think there may be a legally available path under the Supreme Court's decision," Hunt said.

The Hill gave more details:

A lawyer with the Department of Justice (DOJ) said Wednesday that agency officials have been ordered to determine whether there is a way the administration can include a citizenship question on the 2020 census, hours after a tweet from President Trump raised confusion over the status of the question.

Joseph Hunt, an assistant attorney general with DOJ’s civil division, said Wednesday that the department has been “instructed to examine whether there is a path forward, consistent with the Supreme Court's decision, that would allow us to include the citizenship question on the census.”

“We think there may be a legally available path under the Supreme Court's decision. We're examining that, looking at near-term options to see whether that's viable and possible,” Hunt said, according to a transcript of a teleconference held in federal court in Maryland.

The DOJ official said the agency currently plans to file a motion in the Supreme Court that would “govern further proceedings in order to simplify and expedite the remaining litigation and provide clarity to the process going forward.”

“It’s very fluid at present because we are still examining the Supreme Court's decision to see if that option is still available to us,” Hunt added, according to the transcript.

Judge George Hazel, an Obama appointee, who is currently overseeing the federal lawsuit over the citizenship question in Maryland, gave the Trump administration until 2 p.m. Friday to say that it will no longer pursue adding the question to the census.

If not, he asked for a proposed schedule on how he should move forward on reviewing equal protection claims in relation to the question’s addition to the 2020 census.

During Wednesday's teleconference, lawyers opposing the citizenship question suggested that Hazel could issue an order that would halt further speculation about the citizenship question's status.

"Given the way in which this has developed and given the inconsistent statements that we're hearing from the Justice Department and the Commerce Department, on the one hand, and from the president on the other hand, we think that to effectuate the relief that we've sought, which is an injunction barring the inquiring of citizenship status on the 2020 census, this is the kind of relief that's necessary," Shankar Duraiswamy, who is representing some of the parties in the Maryland case, said on the call. "And it's appropriate and within the power of the court."

The call was held after President Trump tweeted earlier Wednesday that his administration would continue to pursue adding the question to the 2020 census, after officials initially said Tuesday that the administration would drop that effort.

Hazel said during the call that he scheduled the conference in light of Trump’s tweet.

“I don't know how many federal judges have Twitter accounts, but I happen to be one of them, and I follow the president, and so I saw a tweet that directly contradicted the position” the DOJ had given the day before, Hazel said, according to the transcript.

“I think I'm actually being really reasonable here and just saying I need a final answer by Friday at 2 p.m. or we're going forward,” the judge said.

Hazel, an Obama appointee, has been tasked with reviewing whether there was a discriminatory intent behind the citizenship question’s addition to the 2020 census, a different legal question than the one addressed by the Supreme Court last week. That case could be potentially be dropped if it’s determined that the question won’t appear.

Joshua Gardner, another DOJ lawyer, indicated during the call that he wasn’t aware of the change in the status of the citizenship question efforts ahead of Trump’s tweet.

“The tweet this morning was the first I had heard of the president's position on this issue, just like the plaintiffs and Your Honor. I do not have a deeper understanding of what that means at this juncture other than what the president has tweeted,” Gardner said. “But, obviously, as you can imagine, I am doing my absolute best to figure out what's going on.”

Judge Jesse Furman, in federal court in New York, has also given DOJ until 6 p.m. on Wednesday to state their “position and intentions” on the citizenship question.

That order came after groups challenging the question requested that Furman, an Obama appointee, hold an emergency hearing on the question’s status, citing the president’s tweet stating that the administration would continue to pursue adding the question to the 2020 census.

Trump administration officials had said Tuesday that the 2020 census would be printed without a citizenship question, but Trump’s tweet appeared to contradict those statements.

The Los Angeles Times also commented on the news that set liberals off the deep end:

The Trump administration reversed course again on the controversial issue of putting a citizenship question on the 2020 census, as Justice Department lawyers told a federal court Wednesday that they had been “instructed” to try to find a way to add the question, despite statements from the administration on Tuesday that they were giving up the effort.

    

The Commerce Department, which oversees the Census Bureau, said Tuesday that it would begin printing forms without the citizenship question, retreating from the legal battle.

     

The government was running out of time to begin printing the millions of forms, and court injunctions continue to bar the administration from adding a question to all forms asking whether household members are U.S. citizens.

    

But President Trump, in a tweet Wednesday, said reports that he had given up the fight were “incorrect or, to state it differently, FAKE!”

     

A White House official declined to comment on what Trump’s tweet meant and whether it had changed the administration’s policy, which is hemmed in by deadlines and legal requirements.

      

But in a court appearance late Wednesday, Trump attorneys indicated — much to the frustration of a federal judge — that they may yet try to find a way to include the question in 2020.

    

“We at the Department of Justice have been instructed to examine whether there is a path forward, consistent with the Supreme Court's decision, that would allow us to include the citizenship question on the census,” said Joseph Hunt, assistant attorney general for the department’s civil division. “We think there may be a legally available path under the Supreme Court's decision. We're examining that, looking at near-term options to see whether that’s viable and possible.”

    

Hunt said the administration plans to go back to the Supreme Court and seek guidance on how to proceed.

     

“Our current plan,” he said, “would be to file a motion in the Supreme Court to request instructions on remand to govern further proceedings in order to simplify and expedite the remaining litigation and to provide clarity to the process going forward.”

            

  

You've gotta wonder why Democrats are driving themselves mad over the issue.

As Charlie Kirk questioned:

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