Mexico Is Now Deporting Criminal Caravan Members Before They Reach The USA!

Mexico Is Now Deporting Criminal Caravan Members Before They Reach The USA!

So we don't have to!


Wow, how about that!

I bet you thought you’d never see this, but it turns out Mexico doesn’t want criminals either!

in a breaking story, officials in Mexico are now deporting criminal members of the Migrant Caravan.

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Take a look:

Talk about ungrateful:

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Here's more, from the Daily Wire:

Mexicans, now saddled with hosting around 3,000 migrants waiting to declare asylum at an official United States border crossing between Tijuana and San Diego, California, are losing patience with the "workers" and deporting those that make trouble back to their home countries.

The Associated Press reports that Tijuana officials have "arrested 34 caravan members for drug possession, public intoxication, disturbing the peace and resisting police, and they would be deported to their home countries," for failing to follow Mexico's laws.

Hundreds of Tijuana residents have also staged protests against the migrants, who have taken over a local soccer stadium to use as a temporary shelter.

The mayor of Tijuana is no stranger to massive migrant caravans, but this one, he says, is different. A Haitian caravan, which also arrived looking for political asylum in the United States and was turned away, consisted largely of refugees looking for work and more permanent homes. Those migrants came prepared with plans and paperwork, and when their asylum claims were rejected, accepted temporary work permits from Mexican officials and did their best to assimilate into Mexican society.

Tijuana's mayor says the Honduran migrants aren't as flexible and are determined to get into the United States even if they have to cross the border illegally. And while wait times to declare asylum can be long, many migrants who might have turned back were emboldened by a court ruling last week overturning a Trump administration directive denying most asylum requests.

"Tijuana Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum has made a point of saying the city is not happy with the migrants who began arriving last week, and he compared the Central American group unfavorably with about 3,000 Haitians who ended up staying after their bid to reach the U.S. failed last year," the AP reported.

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And from the Washington Times / AP:

Migrants camped in Tijuana after traveling in a caravan to reach the U.S were weighing their options Tuesday after a U.S. court blocked President Donald Trump’s asylum ban for illegal border crossers.

Many said they have no intention of breaking the law, but were feeling pressure after anti-migrant protests in this Mexican border city amid claims by Trump and the Tijuana mayor that the caravan harbors gang members and criminals, something they strongly deny.

Keven Paul Mejia, a 27-year-old former security guard from the Honduran capital, Tegucigalpa, said there were some delinquents traveling with the group of several thousand who smoke marijuana and get drunk.

But, he said, most are like him, just hoping to land a job in the U.S. “There are more of us who are good, than bad,” Mejia said.

Herson Cordonez, a 29-year-old Honduran, said the actions of a few migrants were tainting the image of the 4,000 to 6,000 in the caravan, not all of whom have yet reached Tijuana. “We are not criminals, we are migrant workers,” Cordonez said, adding that he was considering trying to get into Canada if the U.S. doesn’t want him.

Tijuana officials said late Monday they had arrested 34 caravan members for drug possession, public intoxication, disturbing the peace and resisting police, and they would be deported to their home countries.

Trump administration officials, who have portrayed the migrant caravans as a threat to the United States, have said there are as many as 500 criminals in the groups heading northward, though they haven’t said what crimes they are accused of or where the figure came from.

On Tuesday, journalists awaited the arrival of Homeland Security Secretary Kristen Nielsen on a San Diego pacific coast beach sliced by a towering border wall wrapped in razor wire. On the Tijuana side, dozens of onlookers gathered with cellphones to take pictures of her arrival through the fence.

A man tried to swim into the U.S. less than an hour before Nielsen’s arrival but was quickly detained by border patrol agents. Five agents were on jet skis offshore along with two border patrol boats, while two drones on the Mexican side hovered just above the wall to get a view of the activity.

Tijuana Mayor Juan Manuel Gastelum has made a point of saying the city is not happy with the migrants who began arriving last week, and he compared the Central American group unfavorably with about 3,000 Haitians who ended up staying after their bid to reach the U.S. failed last year.

Even NPR reported on Mexicans not wanting the Migrants in their country:

The message for the migrant caravan was clear from marchers on Sunday in Tijuana, Mexico: We don't want you here.

"We want the caravan to go; they are invading us," said Patricia Reyes, a 62-year-old protester, hiding from the sun under an umbrella. "They should have come into Mexico correctly, legally, but they came in like animals."

A few hundred Tijuanenses gathered in the city's high-end Rio area to protest the groups migrating from Central American countries.

Demonstrators held signs reading "No illegals," "No to the invasion" and "Mexico First." Many wore the country's red, white and green national soccer jersey and vigorously waved Mexican flags. The crowd often slipped into chants of "Ti-jua-na!" and "Me-xi-co!" They sang the national anthem several times.

The march is a foreboding sign for the migrants who have formed caravans to cross Mexico in hopes of reaching the United States. Many, but not all, of the migrants have come to Tijuana, which borders San Diego, to request asylum in the U.S. They come primarily from Honduras, though some are from other Central American countries. A number of the asylum-seekers say they can't return home after receiving threats from street gangs such as MS-13 and the 18th Street gang, as well as threats from government figures in their countries.

But that process could take months, and the Trump administration is working to block them from entering with new rules to limit asylum.

While the protesters numbered only a few hundred, in a city of more than 1.6 million, vitriol against the migrants has spread across social media in Tijuana in recent days.

"They should create concentration and deportation camps with federal funds," wrote one commenter on the Facebook page organizing the march.

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